Tag: womenswear

 

Edeline Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Always elegantly disciplined, designer Edeline Lee injected some vibrant, dance fuelled joy into her LFW Spring/Summer 2019 show. Deploying any form of dance presentation at fashion week can be a risky affair, however, for Lee all the energy and movement simply showcased her appetite for freedom. Lee believes that "As a designer, I view myself to be in service to women, helping them to be well within their selves and giving them tools to construct and express their identities to the outside world."  She also backed up this committed with impeccable cutting and dynamic prints.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

Amongst all the music, fun and action it was clear that her SS19 collection marked another bold step forward for this fast rising designer. Charged with ruffles and flounces, Lee used these to create movement with a positive spin. "Fashion is a playground for experimentation with performance and identity," she shared. This meant enlisting uplifting, powerful colours such as scarlet and ochre to ultimately bypass too girlie a summer look.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

With dance legends including Trajal Harrell and Pina Bausch as inspiration she kept exploring the relationship between functionality and femininity.  Featuring 28 looks, Lee's energy refused to plateau and hit an even more playful note by introducing a bold zig-zag pattern. Her off kilter colour choices of  brown and green played off against scarlet, blue, ivory and ochre proved again that this collection was designed for women with character and quirk.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

The use of ruffles and ruching became a precision point operation that involved either tiny, pin-hemmed versions or scrunched ruffles and eventually voluptuous, doubled and rolled flounces.Even Lee's shoes were given the ruffle effect.

Lee appreciates that her muse, 'the future lady' as she like to call her "is searching for and assuming diverse identities for different moments in their lives." Lee arms this journey with beautifully cut dresses and skirts that have enough fashion intelligence to also deliver movement and ease.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

During LFW there has been much discussion about empowering fashion. But for Lee, like her brand, it’s about arming oneself for the female journey and using fashion as one's passport.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press

Imagery: Benjamin Tietge 

Ennismore Sessions House, London UK. 17th September 2018. Malene Oddershede Bach shows her designs at her Spring Summer 2019 presentation. © Chris Yates

Malene Oddershede Bach presented a compelling garden of earthly delights for her Spring/Summer 2019 show. Bach is a master of juxtaposing tensions, and for SS19 she explored the dynamic between feminine clothing defined with tomboyish details.

Ennismore Sessions House, London UK. 17th September 2018. Malene Oddershede Bach shows her designs at her Spring Summer 2019 presentation. © Chris Yates

The push and pull between masculine and feminine energies is a powerful theme. And it gave her LFW show a certain intrigue.

Ennismore Sessions House, London UK. 17th September 2018. Malene Oddershede Bach shows her designs at her Spring Summer 2019 presentation. © Chris Yates

Staged against a background of botanicals at the historical Ennismore Sessions House, there was an eerie beauty that fell upon the show. One couldn’t help wonder what lies beneath Bach's delicate floaty floral prints and stunning red carpet creations? For the Danish-born designer, there is always something modern and complex even to her most romantic dresses.

Ennismore Sessions House, London UK. 17th September 2018. Malene Oddershede Bach shows her designs at her Spring Summer 2019 presentation. © Chris Yates

She also charged ahead to include practical classic British stables such as shirt-dresses, PVC rain hats and rain macs. In Bach’s world a woman can never be too prepared. Especially when she doesn’t want to be compromised from wearing Bach’s luxurious jacquards and meticulous floral embroideries.

Ennismore Sessions House, London UK. 17th September 2018. Malene Oddershede Bach shows her designs at her Spring Summer 2019 presentation. © Chris Yates

The London based designer was ever diligent in innovating her brand - whether through new fabrications or playing with such urban staples as bomber jackets.

But it was the haunting focus on intricately embroidered Icelandic poppies that gave Bach's show its real  meaning. Poppies appear fragile, and yet sustain against all environmental odds. Bach understands beauty can survive even the harshest conditions and she insured every one of her SS19 creations showed that strength.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press
Images: Chris Yates

 

On Tuesday 19th, The National Portrait Gallery welcomed another art form to stand alongside their historical collection. 

Tata Naka designers, Tamara and Natasha Surguladze, presented their vintage-inspired SS18 womenswear collection on the third floor of The National Portrait Gallery; a presentation which sat easily amongst the grandeur of its setting.

The Tata Naka SS18 collection saw seasonal summer stripes and vintage florals in contrasting aubergine and daffodil hues; high-waisted tailoring and wide collars gave the collection a retro-feel while the addition of side slits and bare-shoulder necklines remained in-keeping with forecast Spring/Summer trends.

The styling was done to artistic perfection. Dark lipstick and a reflective sheen to the contouring, giving the models an artificial quality  - real-life portraits of modern-vintage dress.

Words: Scarlett Sangster | Fashion Week Press | @scarlettgracehs

Images: Rosemary Pitts |Fashion Week Photographer|@rosemarypitts

Designer Jamie Wei Huang’s SS18 collection, “Dew”, was inspired by the fragmented recounting and retelling of personal experience. It was a concept drawn from Huang’s reflection on her own traditional Taiwanese culture, and captured by the beautiful, hesitantly accumulative piano piece which instigated her show.

 

The story began in stripes. Blues, pinks and greens growing in depth and vivacity with each piece, a gradual solidifying of colours to correlate that of re-emerging memory; the punctuation of bold reds, yellows and cobalt in the shoes and accessories, providing those colourful splashes of certainty which continue to emerge throughout the collection.

Ball Gown Wedding Dress NZ

Huang’s Spring/Summer designs favour easy-fit clothing; wedding dresses and jumpsuits tying into her signature style of elongated silhouettes with a focus on creating contemporary fashion for the modern woman.

Wedding Dresses

The concept of construction was apparent in the rough-cut hems, sewn on pockets and undisguised use of zips, drawstrings and metallic rings which both decorated the pieces and acted as functional elements of the designs.

Creative cut-outs were another standout feature, with gaping knees and bare-backed jackets building on the impression of fragmented recollection, while asymmetric designs alluded to the inevitable incompleteness of memory.

Denim-look fabrics, and the brave contrasting of colour-block socks with easy slip-on sandals concluded the collection with a sense of layered individuality, promoting self-expression through contemporary fashion.

Originally from Taiwan, Huang graduated from Central Saint Martins College in London in 2012, launching her designer label Jamie Wei Huang to great critical acclaim in 2013; winning both the “Designer For Tomorrow” award, and the “Elle talent Award” for her AQ14 collection. Huang’s designs are now sold internationally in luxury retailers such as Harvey Nichols, Dover Street Market, David Jones Sydney and mimma ninni.

Words: Scarlett Sangster | Fashion Week Press | @scarlettgracehs

Images: Rosemary Pitts |Fashion Week Photographer|@rosemarypitts

Phoebe English is first and foremost a craftsman within her trade. Just by looking at her men's and women's collections, it is always clear to see that her ethos is to not only create art but to engineer every aspect of it. The young designer is also a passionate advocate of underappreciated and sometimes even lost construction techniques. So it is always a fascinating experience to be able to learn about these processes that take place very often away from prying public eyes.

For SS18 English presented a collection that works closely with another long-standing craft: Puppets.

With models lining the room in English's visions for SS18, standing along side them were puppets (also named marionettes) hanging from strings and wearing miniature versions of each piece. In a theatrical sense, this setting was reminiscent of a Tim Burton film with dark romantic undertones cutting through. The faceless puppets mimicking their human twins were charming and yet hauntingly striking. The lighting, which created shadows throughout the room, heightened the dramatic air and drew attention to the careful construction of each piece.

Marionettes were not only used for dramatic effect, their entry into the SS18 collection was whole-heartedly a way for English to show the foundations of her craft and pay homage to the past techniques of design. It is this simplicity of her silhouettes, cuts and monochromatic colour palette that lets the eye see past whatever may be on the surface and truly look to the finer details. Details such as the careful draping of fabrics and textured knots of black bra- like tops, on top of clean-cut white shirts.

Muslin and poplin materials are overlayed with mesh and tulle that give textured feel, making the clothes unreservedly wearable but gives them that stand-out quality.

It was this clever decision to duplicate the designs which show just how adaptable fashion can be. Be it on the smaller scale, on a puppet for a showcase with an edgy punch. Or the life-sized version that will be worn by people within their daily lives over the coming season.

English pulled the strings behind-the-scenes to showcase her dark fairy-tale at London Fashion Week. Like all good fairy-tales its important to look to the message beneath the surface. In this case English's message is simple: We should all take the time to admire the methods that go into creating our favourite styles. After all fashion is above all else an enduring craft.

 

Words: Sophie Joaman| Fashion Week Press| @londonellagram

images: Rosemary Pitts| Fashion Week Photography| @rosemarypitts