Tag: london fashion week

 

Dilara Findikoglu - London Banking Hall

A low lit room, combined with the classically inspired architecture of London’s Banking Hall set the scene for Findikoglu’s AW/18 collection, where we see Findikoglu’s designs reflect some aspects of a Tim Burton gothic styled film. The models makeup vaguely reminiscent of an renaissance styled painting, the clothing itself featuring structured jumpsuits and pin-stripe blazers adorned with a selection of renaissance styled images - particularly focusing around eyes and hand drawn female figurative portraits and photographs, lending the collection a totally eerie but super cool perspective.

The collection featured elements mainly around the use of leather and PVC, focusing on the prominence and stand-out reflective aesthetic of these materials. Patchwork cut outs are seen emblazoned along open neck blazers with other items adorned with patterned silk sashes around areas such as the waistline complete slashed open dresses.

With the images reflecting the inspiration around the clothing, as we see several of Findikoglu’s designs draw inspiration and focus around different historical periods, ranging from the iconic broad shoulder pads of the 80’s flanked against exaggerated white cuffs and overgrown shirts, Iconic Sphinx and snake-like patterns commonly associated with the ancient Egyptian culture and the gown wearing, open upper torso dresses popular within the Tudor period.

Accessories are an abstract but all necessary feature within this collection as we see several pieces including miniature figurines, broad open angular diamond jewellery, nude photographic portraits and those all too necessary items of cutlery which lend an all-too-cool steampunk inspired look to the clothing.

(Why go hunting around the office for a clean spoon when you can carry one with you at all times right?)

Angular neck pieces were also on show, which had a life of their own altogether. With other items following suit such as large angular belts encrusted with the signature steampunk cogs, gears and  lengthy beaded tassels. There’s even a Bladerunner themed Zhora PVC shawl - who couldn’t resist this?

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Writer |

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

Fashion loves a slogan – it’s one of the easiest and most effective ways to convey a message through clothing. Amid our current uncertain social and political climate, more and more designers seek to make a statement that goes beyond the fashion. From Dior’s “We should All be Feminists” to Gucci and Balenciaga’s self-riffing logos, slogans have certainly had a resurgence of late. If done well, they can reach iconic status and go down in fashion history – i.e. the likes of Katharine Hamnett. However, if done poorly they can feel forced, disingenuous and meaningless.

 

 

Presented against the backdrop of a mock warehouse, UNDERAGE’s AW18 collection had something to say. Inspired by the punk movement of a bygone era of youth subculture, the collection aimed to capture the zeitgeist through a selection of unisex looks adorned with a range of slogans: “We Are Youth,” “Live Fast Die Young,” “Yada Yada Yada” – garments cried out in bold strokes of red, yellow and gold, expressing a contempt for authority and an aim to celebrate rebellion, nonconformity and self-expression.

 

 

A successful slogan should be witty, intelligent and original – if not thought provoking. It should be something that people feel compelled to display upon themselves as a statement aimed at letting the world know who they are and what they stand for. This was lacking here, slogans felt unimaginative and uninspiring; “Yada Yada Yada” – is this what young people really want to proudly wear as an emblem of their beliefs and identity?

 

 

In a fusion of decades of youth culture iconography, brooding models wore spray painted Doc Marten style boots, conservatively tailored pieces; overcoats, trousers and blazers, juxtaposed with more contemporary pieces; hoodies, puffer jackets and bum bags – all screen printed with skull motifs, mock- devoré metallics and graffiti- esque graphics.

 

 

Titled Riots of Our Own this was UNDERAGE’S reimagining of what someone of a similar mind-set to a 70’s punk would wear today. Capturing the essence of youthful rebellion in a post subculture world – in which fashion has become a lot more homogenised, is no easy feat; but quite literally spelling it out across a selection of garish garments is not quite convincing as a particularly fresh or modern approach. Is this what the youth of today, even those who regard themselves as the most nonconforming, want to wear? The sentiment was there but the execution felt crude and somewhat cliché.

 

 

Words: Lucy Hardy | Fashion Week Writer | @lula_har

Images: Mikayla Miller | Fashion Week Photographer | @mikaylajeanmiller

Blossoming prints are a theme in this seasons addition to Claire Tagg’s AW18 collection. A gentle nudge to the soon to be spring season, as the collection adorns a gentle cascade of orchid and floral prints traversing down and across the clothing in a decorative and light manner with some bold colour clashes thrown in between, with the clothing primarily focused on the effect of colour against its neutral white or singular colour base coat.

 

The show space itself even reflects the gentle and subtle themes of Claire’s work, as the models embrace the stage to be fawned over by the and photographers and voyeurs alike. Accompanied by the eloquent compositional music of Ludovico Einaudi’s Divenire, the show set a subtle scene of peacefulness and serenity that reflected the clothing.

 

 

Although Tagg’s collection did feature a few themes of vibrancy, particularly with kimonos and accessories such as flowery hoop earrings (which by the way, we think are really cool).

 

 

The collection itself featured a mixture of subtle pastel colours with splashes of colour blocking thrown into the clothing ranging from hand tied crop tops adorned with sequins to the previously mentioned kimonos, longer length skirts that flow with effortless grace and some avant-garde half coats sustained by straps, accompanied with draping forearm wraps.

 

Surrounded by an all-white stage, it is clear to see how Tagg’s influence has stemmed from the transition and beauty arising from the the development of flowers during the spring and autumnal seasons with the nude and natural makeup palette on the models allowing for the clothing to essentially speak for itself. The models essentially look heavenly while adorned in the clothing, with themes of innocence and virginal beauty lending a developmental story to the collection about the growth of nature as the models descend from the stage in a graceful manner to manoeuvre around the hungry crowd.

 

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Press

Images: Megan Love | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

Are millennials the most self-centred generation ever?

You know how the media storyline goes: all narcissistic behaviour disorder, pantone pinks and lashings of avocado on toast.  We are in an age fuelled by the endless opportunity for self-promotion via social media, combined with a cultural attitude that hails self-esteem and personal-positivity as both the single most important and most destructive skill we can possess. But is this unashamed celebration of the self really such a bad thing? We say, not when you’ve got a damn good reason to toot your horn.

Enter then, Ryan Lo, whose AW18 presentation was dedicated to his one true passion in life: himself. “It is simply about what I love to do!”, Lo describes of this one-off special edition collection of his greatest creative hits, all set against the perfectly apt millennial pink backdrop of David Shrigley’s gallery restaurant at Sketch.

 

Drop-waist tulle gowns (fit for the modern day princess) lean effortlessly next to chevron-striped lace, in sugar-rich shades sweet enough to warrant a filling. Jumping straight from saccharine to seductive, lace takes on a whole new light as it covers (just) a reclining figure luxuriously draped in black, revealing and concealing in all the right places. Luckily this particular model is a cold, hard mannequin, with little regard for modesty but a high regard for matching flapper-style opera gloves that just tickle the elbow for an extra smack of decadence.

 

There is inspiration here that spans the ages, regaling not only the fashionable history of our time, but of Lo’s reputable archive. He often draws upon child-like nostalgia, filtering his designs through a romantic lens to create eclectic designs that are both feminine and fantastical - and this collection embodies all that and more. From hyper-modern kawaii fabrics that shimmer in the light, to exaggerated victoriana style pussybows that are dramatic and demure in equal measure, this collection is a true celebration of the full Ryan Lo spectrum.

 

There is always a criticism that surrounds millennials, in that we are wrongly raised to believe that we can be whoever we want to be. But anything is possible for the woman in this Lo’s rose-tinted fantasy world. The flapper. The hostess. The queen. There’s no cohesive story here as such, just great threads, great women and the great man who designed them. “I love me” is a juxtaposing curation of Lo’s favourites and celebration of everything he has achieved - and when it looks as good as this, long may the self-love continue. Just don’t tell the elders.

 

Words: Camilla Hunt | Fashion Editor | @camillamcleanhunt

Fyodor Golan's AW18 London Fashion Week collection was a high-flying, yet utterly down-to-earth showcase of motion and colour. The creative duo, who are known for their experimental flair, this time drew their new season concept from the sky. Rainbows inspired the aesthetics and colour scheme, while hot air balloons influenced the dynamic movements of every piece. The show, In collaboration with MTV, struck a youthful chord proving that leisurewear is constantly being adopted and adapted by each generation.

 

With planets and orbs decorating the showspace, this was certainly one collection that hoped to elevate edgy styles to new heights. The retro 1980s feel of the collection was injected with a spectrum of colour that exuded a thoroughly playful spirit. Pleated skirts layered over tracksuits challenged the traditional rules of luxury leisurewear while preaching the Fyodor Golan X MTV attitude of being young, adventurous and original.

 

 

Fyodor Golan's ethos of always achieving new modes of motion was enhanced by the literal and metaphorical idea of hot air balloons. Sweeping dresses with gathered hems Vs fluent tracksuits moved with a light and effortless breeze, poised to take flight. The collection is also prepped for the Autumn/Winter season, with chunky knits and over-sized jackets.

 

 

The show succeeded in creating ready-to-wear fashion that is ready to reach unlimited heights and still, it came across as accessible to anyone.

 

Words: Sophie Joaman| Fashion Week Press|

Images: Martina Bruno | Fashion Week Photographer | @martinabrunoph