Tag: london

The Cassey Gan AW19 show took place in the Freemason Hall and was capturing from the get go. Surrounding the collection was upbeat music, bright colours and of course, bowls of fruits & vegetables — what else?

Named Pixelated, Gan drew inspiration from Tim Braden - dissolving and reassembling her world for this AW19 show.

 

Known for her loose fitting clothing silhouettes, original prints and lightweight texture, this season for the first time she has experiments with thicker fabrics. Using innovative shapes and heavy layering, this collection combines comfort and style, making it as modern as it is elegant.

A colour palette of blues, olives, maroons and mustard, the clashing of the prints really do mix the timeless with the trendy effortlessly throughout this range.

Influenced also by the impossible pace of the fashion industry and the inevitable changes rooted in the digital age, Gan harnesses her frustrations at the speed which designers now work — this collection, Pixelated, comments on the love-hate paradox Gan sees in contemporary fashion.

Words: Andrea McCaul| Fashion Week Press | @andreaelizam
Images: Fashion Scout 

Jolin Wu returned to London Fashion Week after ten years for her AW19 show. Inspired by the iconic 1982 sci-fi film Blade Runner, Wu tells Fashion Scout, “My main inspiration is the film blade runner — the old one, the vintage one! That’s my biggest inspiration. That film affected me a lot. Everything – the film, the imagery, the dialogue, the music – everything. This is the 10th year of my business, and I wanted to do a collection that felt special. The film is so special for me, so it seemed right. The collection is about the future – how I imagine the future will be.”

You can see this inspiration throughout the collection, androgynous designs walking down the catwalk — delicate garments with a retro sportswear twist. 

Always experimenting with vivid colour, Wu used a mixture of red, silver, electric indigo, space blue, beige with neon green and yellow, as well as touches of pastel pink and drawstring handbags in purple and brown. It didn’t end there, with the unique make-up on each model making a true statement. Models had their hair loosely pulled back in low ponytails or wind-blown fringes, adding to the effortless feel of the designs.

A combination of textures, from velvet to tweed, the collection includes slip dresses, oversized coats, high neck tops and gloves that mixes elegance with an edgy feel.

Establishing her own brand in 2008, Wu focuses on womenswear (with a little menswear for the first time ever this season), and has been inspired by Masion Margiela throughout her career — you can’t go far wrong with that!

 

Words: Andrea McCaul | Fashion Week Press | @andreaelizam
Images: Fashion Scout 

I started my AW19 season for London Fashion Week at the Alice Archer show. Walking in to the sound of gentle, relaxing music playing in the background, models were being escorting in and out setting the scene for an extremely elegant show.

The Alice Archer AW19 collection was inspired by the early 16th century artist Lucas Cranah and his use of rich colours and sumptuous proportions of his subjects. Especially taken by the painting ‘Cupid Complaining to Venus’, she used her love of it throughout each design, working it into the prints and embroidery seen throughout the range.

Focusing on the Cranach’s depiction of apples, Archer developed a technique of embroidering in white thread overlaid with her oil paintings of apples from trees in Somerset - giving the designs a painterly feel. Also inspired by medieval woodcuts of snowball and hawthorn trees the embroidered pieces in this collection have a real connection to nature, with the addition of hand embellished pearls making them three-dimensional, bringing it all to life.

From fitted bodice dresses and coats to two piece suits featuring flared trousers this collection is the epitome of modern luxury. Florals on velvet and corduroy fabrics gives each piece a unique touch. What stood out the most for me was details on the sleeves - capes and ruffles gave a slight edge to the sophisticated nature of the show.

Alice Archer graduated from RCA in 2013, she moved to Antwerp to work as an embroidery designer for Dries van Noten. She has since worked frequently with Tracey Emin, producing her hand embroidered art work. So, you can see she’s had a passion for embroidery throughout her career, making this collection all the more specialist!

Words: Andrea McCaul| Fashion Week Press | @andreaelizam
Images: Fashion Scout 

 

Dilara Findikoglu - London Banking Hall

A low lit room, combined with the classically inspired architecture of London’s Banking Hall set the scene for Findikoglu’s AW/18 collection, where we see Findikoglu’s designs reflect some aspects of a Tim Burton gothic styled film. The models makeup vaguely reminiscent of an renaissance styled painting, the clothing itself featuring structured jumpsuits and pin-stripe blazers adorned with a selection of renaissance styled images - particularly focusing around eyes and hand drawn female figurative portraits and photographs, lending the collection a totally eerie but super cool perspective.

The collection featured elements mainly around the use of leather and PVC, focusing on the prominence and stand-out reflective aesthetic of these materials. Patchwork cut outs are seen emblazoned along open neck blazers with other items adorned with patterned silk sashes around areas such as the waistline complete slashed open dresses.

With the images reflecting the inspiration around the clothing, as we see several of Findikoglu’s designs draw inspiration and focus around different historical periods, ranging from the iconic broad shoulder pads of the 80’s flanked against exaggerated white cuffs and overgrown shirts, Iconic Sphinx and snake-like patterns commonly associated with the ancient Egyptian culture and the gown wearing, open upper torso dresses popular within the Tudor period.

Accessories are an abstract but all necessary feature within this collection as we see several pieces including miniature figurines, broad open angular diamond jewellery, nude photographic portraits and those all too necessary items of cutlery which lend an all-too-cool steampunk inspired look to the clothing.

(Why go hunting around the office for a clean spoon when you can carry one with you at all times right?)

Angular neck pieces were also on show, which had a life of their own altogether. With other items following suit such as large angular belts encrusted with the signature steampunk cogs, gears and  lengthy beaded tassels. There’s even a Bladerunner themed Zhora PVC shawl - who couldn’t resist this?

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Writer |

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

Fyodor Golan's AW18 London Fashion Week collection was a high-flying, yet utterly down-to-earth showcase of motion and colour. The creative duo, who are known for their experimental flair, this time drew their new season concept from the sky. Rainbows inspired the aesthetics and colour scheme, while hot air balloons influenced the dynamic movements of every piece. The show, In collaboration with MTV, struck a youthful chord proving that leisurewear is constantly being adopted and adapted by each generation.

 

With planets and orbs decorating the showspace, this was certainly one collection that hoped to elevate edgy styles to new heights. The retro 1980s feel of the collection was injected with a spectrum of colour that exuded a thoroughly playful spirit. Pleated skirts layered over tracksuits challenged the traditional rules of luxury leisurewear while preaching the Fyodor Golan X MTV attitude of being young, adventurous and original.

 

 

Fyodor Golan's ethos of always achieving new modes of motion was enhanced by the literal and metaphorical idea of hot air balloons. Sweeping dresses with gathered hems Vs fluent tracksuits moved with a light and effortless breeze, poised to take flight. The collection is also prepped for the Autumn/Winter season, with chunky knits and over-sized jackets.

 

 

The show succeeded in creating ready-to-wear fashion that is ready to reach unlimited heights and still, it came across as accessible to anyone.

 

Words: Sophie Joaman| Fashion Week Press|

Images: Martina Bruno | Fashion Week Photographer | @martinabrunoph