Tag: LFW S/S 2019

 

Edeline Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Always elegantly disciplined, designer Edeline Lee injected some vibrant, dance fuelled joy into her LFW Spring/Summer 2019 show. Deploying any form of dance presentation at fashion week can be a risky affair, however, for Lee all the energy and movement simply showcased her appetite for freedom. Lee believes that "As a designer, I view myself to be in service to women, helping them to be well within their selves and giving them tools to construct and express their identities to the outside world."  She also backed up this committed with impeccable cutting and dynamic prints.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

Amongst all the music, fun and action it was clear that her SS19 collection marked another bold step forward for this fast rising designer. Charged with ruffles and flounces, Lee used these to create movement with a positive spin. "Fashion is a playground for experimentation with performance and identity," she shared. This meant enlisting uplifting, powerful colours such as scarlet and ochre to ultimately bypass too girlie a summer look.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

With dance legends including Trajal Harrell and Pina Bausch as inspiration she kept exploring the relationship between functionality and femininity.  Featuring 28 looks, Lee's energy refused to plateau and hit an even more playful note by introducing a bold zig-zag pattern. Her off kilter colour choices of  brown and green played off against scarlet, blue, ivory and ochre proved again that this collection was designed for women with character and quirk.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

The use of ruffles and ruching became a precision point operation that involved either tiny, pin-hemmed versions or scrunched ruffles and eventually voluptuous, doubled and rolled flounces.Even Lee's shoes were given the ruffle effect.

Lee appreciates that her muse, 'the future lady' as she like to call her "is searching for and assuming diverse identities for different moments in their lives." Lee arms this journey with beautifully cut dresses and skirts that have enough fashion intelligence to also deliver movement and ease.

Edeline Lee FW Spring/Summer 2019

During LFW there has been much discussion about empowering fashion. But for Lee, like her brand, it’s about arming oneself for the female journey and using fashion as one's passport.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press

Imagery: Benjamin Tietge 

 

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Like a Twilight Zone daydream humming away in the backs of our minds, Starsica walked a surreal line for SS19. Designer Ike Seungik Lee’s collection was a strange cocktail of synthetic and distorted retoesque glamour.

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

It was a beautiful and compelling collection and the models enjoyed themselves clicking away to cool jazz. Charming indeed, but still hypnotic, as Lee explored how fashion is defined and invented through the prisms of television and social media.

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Like the perfect wardrobe for a surreal cocktail party there were dramatically cut shoulders and sleeves. Amongst floating multi-tiered dresses of serene pastels and tropic prints, occasionally a shot of plastic appeared.

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

One standout was a plastic coat covered with sticker images in the Fornasetti style of Roman busts.

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Lee didn’t censor his imagination, nor its media memories. Rather, it was an interesting play on tensions; with exaggerated The Jetsons-like dresses and dollops of irresistible accessories, including funky handbags and earrings.

Starsica LFW Spring/Summer 2019

As models wafted down the runway in these exaggerated silhouettes one wondered had Lee indulged in some brightly coloured “mother’s little helpers”?  Indeed, Lee is the perfect enabler for our fashion addictions, and with so many sumptuous dresses, don’t expect him to wake us if we OD.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press

Images: Simon Armstrong

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

If fashion is a form of armour than what type of war was J JS Lee wanting to protect us from? In Jackie JS Lee's uplifting London Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 collection, the Korean born designer took the audience on a protective journey.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

The idea of being cocooned was prominent with Lee using silk wool and satins for her beautifully deconstructed dresses and suits. And yet her collection never felt insecure or repressed.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

It’s tempting for fashion designers to buy into the hyperbole of media and politics, but J JS Lee rose above all that and explored the human experience of wearing fashion as a tool for usefulness, integrity and indeed protection.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

With models wearing a selection of sharply cut suits, dresses and shirts in lightweight cotton poplins it felt at times as though J JS Lee was projecting the idea of urban angels. The optimistic glow of buttercup yellow, burning mustards and bold reds slowly gave way to her bigger idea of fluidity and freedom with white and metallic suits.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

Backstage after the show, crowded with impeccably dressed family and friends, Lee discussed her inspiration with WJ London for referencing half-furnished upholstering, the idea being of furniture protection covers for the arms or back of sofas.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

“We took some sculpture shapes from a furniture cover, the idea of protecting from the sofa and we took that idea," Lee said. "The off the shoulder idea came from furniture cover and we wanted to focus on details like the labels.”

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

This gave her collection its most intriguing narrative and elevated her love of deconstructed tailoring into a more fluid and considered offering. Protection meant for her focusing on the shoulders included cutout details and then alternatively cotton poplin shirts featured overlays were tightly stretched across the shoulders.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

She featured fine wool from Dugdale Bros & Co and then twisted such traditional fabrics by revealing at the back of jackets cut out raw edging. Nothing was presented without a surprise twist to the traditional. “I'm based in London and I love English heritage,” Lee told WJ London.

J JS Lee LFW Spring/Summer 2019

And she was excited by the idea of funnelling her own minimalist aesthetic into “very traditional hounds tooth from the Dugdale symbol... and we took the dry wax cotton and that was waterproof”. Her love of English heritage seemingly gave her show the right grounding to soar to new heights.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press
Images: Nikals Haze

Simon Mo Spring/Summer 2019

Simon Mo presented a tightrope act of fashion meets environmental commentary for his Spring/Summer 2019 show. A passionate environmentalist, Mo is committed to exploring the beauty and fragility of nature.

Simon Mo Spring/Summer 2019

These are big themes to present on a runway; the idea of our vulnerable, exploited earth and yet Mo is sophisticated enough in his choice of fabrics and tailored cuts to easy his London Fashion Week audience into such a weighty philosophy.

Simon Mo Spring/Summer 2019

Fluid and imaginative Mo in fact achieved the opposite affect – making our spirits soar. The collection benefited from Mo’s research into one of his much loved childhood stories, Sinbad the Sailor and he applied its sense of adventure to his nautical inspired over-size shirts, loose jackets and fluid dresses.

Simon Mo Spring/Summer 2019

The Taiwanese more designer’s tailoring was particularly exciting with him introducing exotic coloured jacquards, bright tartans and even sequins. There was even dresses constructed of red or blue velour. There was a sense that Mo enjoyed entering a new terrain via his athleisure references of vintage suba diving suits and sequined hot pants.

Simon Mo Spring/Summer 2019

Comfortable and yet compassionate Mo shared his environmental message with an easy feeling, comfortable collection.

Words: Catherine Caines | Fashion Week Press

Images: Eloise Peachey | Fashion Week Photographer | @eloisepeacheyphoto

If Matty Bovan's last collection was apocalyptic, the latest SS19 collection was the stage on which the natural world slowly began to reclaim the post-apocalyptic landscape. From the first look, featuring a deconstructed gown of netting, crinoline and a precariously towering floral headpiece, foliage and creeping vines were woven into the fabric of the collection and the psyches of those watching from the darkness.

Inspired by the back garden of his childhood suburban Yorkshire home and the point where rolling hills and moors clashed with the urban sprawl, one felt the full force of his creative vision in a masterful display of mixed fabrics and media. From hand crocheted flowers adorning further striking gowns sprouting tufts of dark greens, purples, yellows and blacks, to screen-printed figure-hugging dresses belted around the chest with gypsy-esque bikini tops, there was something carnivalesque about the clash of colours, textures and silhouettes. The increasingly eccentric and whimsical headpieces featuring everything from toilet plungers to plates of sushi recalled some sort of mad hatters tea party and the imaginative games of childhood summers.

However, this collection did not succumb to nostalgia. Models with intricately dyed hair reminiscent of The Man Who Fell to Earth that matched a gorgeous array of laced ankle boots and canary yellow cuban-heeled highwayman's boots designed by Gina kept driving this energetic collection forward.

In a time when the London Fashion Scene, mirroring the wider socio-political climate has been through something of a crisis, one felt a glimmer of hope. A message that the natural world, that beauty, inspiration and creativity would reclaim a scene that had become a slave to social media and plagued by plastic influencers. This collection was subversive, but subversive for being beautiful, natural and expressive.

In the words of the late, great Leonard Cohen, "there is a crack in everything, that's how the light gets in".

Words: Mitchell Kirkham-Cooper| Writer

Images: Eloise Peachey | Fashion Week Photographer | @eloisepeacheyphoto