Tag: aw18

 

 

Paula Knorr AW/18 - 180 The Strand

Could there be a more glamorous and elegantly stunning collection than that of Paula Knorr? Well, the designer, most recognised and well known for creating clothing that empowers women has done it again. Knorr’s AW18 collection featured some stunning pieces, once again we see the signature aesthetic use of materials such as Lamé, mesh and liquid-like velvet.

Giving a nod to the lucrative feel of the material, we see the models in the Knorr show standing vigilantly around a large flowing piece of Lamé on the floor, the fluidity of it all and reflection of the lighting allowing the aesthetic glittering principles of the material to stand out on the models, giving them their appearance of deities.

Within the collection we see the use of elegantly layers, primarily focused around one shoulder dresses with a mixture of shiny black, neutral palettes and sanguine colours. Slit dresses and lengthy forearm wraps are also a feature alongside sequinned, and mesh tops and skirts completed with linear patterns throughout. Pointed-toe shoes are also present, giving the already lucrative collection a sharp edge.

Knorr’s feature of bauhaus inspired jewellery presents a welcome juxtaposition to the fluidity of her collection, as we see linear-inspired metallic ear pierces and a totally cool hybrid between a ring styled bracelet.

If you are heading to any award shows or big events this year or, perhaps, you simply want to look and feel amazing, then this collection is the one for you.

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Press

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

 

Dilara Findikoglu - London Banking Hall

A low lit room, combined with the classically inspired architecture of London’s Banking Hall set the scene for Findikoglu’s AW/18 collection, where we see Findikoglu’s designs reflect some aspects of a Tim Burton gothic styled film. The models makeup vaguely reminiscent of an renaissance styled painting, the clothing itself featuring structured jumpsuits and pin-stripe blazers adorned with a selection of renaissance styled images - particularly focusing around eyes and hand drawn female figurative portraits and photographs, lending the collection a totally eerie but super cool perspective.

The collection featured elements mainly around the use of leather and PVC, focusing on the prominence and stand-out reflective aesthetic of these materials. Patchwork cut outs are seen emblazoned along open neck blazers with other items adorned with patterned silk sashes around areas such as the waistline complete slashed open dresses.

With the images reflecting the inspiration around the clothing, as we see several of Findikoglu’s designs draw inspiration and focus around different historical periods, ranging from the iconic broad shoulder pads of the 80’s flanked against exaggerated white cuffs and overgrown shirts, Iconic Sphinx and snake-like patterns commonly associated with the ancient Egyptian culture and the gown wearing, open upper torso dresses popular within the Tudor period.

Accessories are an abstract but all necessary feature within this collection as we see several pieces including miniature figurines, broad open angular diamond jewellery, nude photographic portraits and those all too necessary items of cutlery which lend an all-too-cool steampunk inspired look to the clothing.

(Why go hunting around the office for a clean spoon when you can carry one with you at all times right?)

Angular neck pieces were also on show, which had a life of their own altogether. With other items following suit such as large angular belts encrusted with the signature steampunk cogs, gears and  lengthy beaded tassels. There’s even a Bladerunner themed Zhora PVC shawl - who couldn’t resist this?

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Writer |

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

In her latest exploration of the woman, for AW18 Edeline Lee transported us to a secret garden, where we find Eve – still and reflective. This season Lee is taking a moment for self-reflection. Stepping into one of Lee’s presentations is always a relaxing occasion. She included a copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Forest Reverie within the show notes, encouraging us to pause for thought away from the hustle and bustle of the fashion week circus, whilst soothing gong music played in the background.

Whilst impeccably tailored as always, compared to Lee’s previous work this collection was fairly subdued and lacked the quirky nuances of which Lee is known for. Gone were the extreme length sleeves and abstract shapes from last season; silhouettes were monastic and modest. Lee does well to appeal to the growing market for modest high fashion.

The colour palette was suitably autumnal, consisting of rich jewel tones of deep purple, red, moss green and navy. Pieces include floor length dresses in Lee’s signature flou bubble jacquard, styled under heavy weight coats. Garments were elegantly flourished with tassels, knots and folds.

Shorter length dresses were paired with skin tight sock boots in a range of colours that disappeared underneath the dresses. Trousers were wide legged and heavy weight in floral jacquard, styled with matching ruffled cropped top. The floral elements of the collection came in deep, dark colours as well as lighter, brighter shades.

 

Overall, Lee’s foray into the secret garden was luxurious and refined – but missing an alluring edge.

 

Words: Lucy Hardy | Fashion Week Writer | @lula_har

Photography by Jessamine Cera  | Fashion Week Photographer |

 

Settling in to our seats in the BFC Showspace on the first day of LFW AW18, we were primed and ready to start the season off with Bora Aksu’s signature florals and floating fabrics. His beautiful and feminine collections are a much-loved staple of fashion week, providing tranquillity amongst the madness. So we were all intrigued when the first model marched onto the runway in a navy tailored jacket and wide-legged trousers, no lace or sheer fabrics in sight.

Inspired by the story of Margaret Ann Bulkley, a woman back in the 1800s who had to dress as a man in order to practice as a surgeon, this season’s collection is an exploration of that metamorphosis, from woman to man and back again.

Structured silhouettes, heavy velvet materials and dark, rich colours emulated the masculine uniform that Bulkley had to wear in her role as Dr James Barry, but flamboyant edging and intricate detailing nod to the female within.

As the collection develops, hemlines become more floating, fabrics become lighter and jackets sit over dresses and skirts, juxtaposing the two opposite styles in a way that complements each of them, as well as the wearer.

Of course, it wouldn’t be an Aksu show without his florals; layers of pastel pleats in tulle and organza eventually appear on the catwalk, sat atop simple silhouettes, giving them depth and intrigue and eluding to the enigmatic nature of Bulkley and the mystery of her role.

As the models reappeared in the show space and lined up in a group ready to walk around the room one last time in a synchronised strut, the exposition that runs through the collection became even more evident. Ultimately, this collection is still the Aksu that we know and love, but his exploration of femininity now moves beyond the confines of societal expectations and stereotypes to delve into what it means to be a woman in today’s world – and indeed, for one woman in Georgian society.

 

Words: Katharine Bennett | Fashion Week Press | @misskatebennett

Photos: Mikayla Miller | Fashion Week Photographer | @mikaylajeanmiller

The BFC showspace was packed on day 4 of fashion week, expectantly waiting for Faustine Steinmetz’s girl army to take to the catwalk. Formerly eschewing shows for presentations to avoid sensationalising the fashion industry, the designer decided to make her catwalk debut back in September and learnt that she could put just as much of her own spin on it as she could with specially-designed sets, showing off her reworkings of classic styles in all their glory. And we couldn’t wait to see how the AW18 Steinmetz woman would be painted on the blank canvas of this season’s catwalk.

Set to the sounds of some of our favourite 90s R&B ladies, the collection was, as ever, a delight to the well-organised mind. Steinmetz’s staple pieces returned with fresh updates, allowing the wearer to concentrate less on what to wear and more on which piece would perfectly reflect her personality and individual style.

A veritable uniform of trench coats, shirts, jeans and slip dresses came down the runway, each nodding to the others with coordinating details and textures, but at the same time retaining its own unique DNA.

Pale green silks and woody browns wovens join the designer’s signature denim; which this season has become deeper and darker than SS18, with knitted and felted additions to both tops and jeans providing texture.

Things are definitely matchy-matchy this season, with layers of sultry silks in different finishes, cosy cream knitwear and denims of slightly different grains and colours building on top of themselves on each model into entire outfits.

Accessories, too, are not exempt from the Steinmetz treatment; Fendi-esque baguettes become beaded and covered in Swarovski crystals, adding a little glamour to casual silhouettes, and the ultimate in Parisian chic, the Hermès horse-print scarf, appeared as slinky below-the-knee skirts and slouchy handkerchief tops.

It’s impressive and, ultimately, completely baffling that Steinmetz approaches each season with the same blueprint, and yet the collections that are revealed are so unique and instantly covetable. They’re at once pieces that you could expect to find in your own wardrobe at home, but also totally fresh and exciting, speaking of a season to come where you can be both up-to-the-minute on-trend and comfortable.

As the models did their final walk and we saw the collection as a whole, it was almost like creating an outfit using that computer wardrobe from Clueless that we all long for – if you loved a top but weren’t sure if the jeans with it would suit, the outfit following along behind it would surely offer you another option that would coordinate just as well. It’s a vision for the future of fashion which inspires and delights – quite frankly, I would wear the Steinmetz uniform any day of the week.

Words: Katharine Bennett | Fashion Week Press | @misskatebennett

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | @joshuaatkins