For KTZ SS18,   we saw an urban utilitarian collection that was underpinned by a strong narrative of struggle. A number of looks both presented and subverted traditional icons of repression and control. Military khakis were slashed through with shards of metal, black collared jackets paired with straight leg trousers or tailored shorts and heavy black boots recalled police uniforms and yet were emblazoned with images of hands forming the shapes of hearts or slogans such as "club of nowhere". even what, at first glance, appeared to be knightly chainmail worn as vests or sleeves or even dripping from baseball caps like visors turned out to be a mesh of interlinked soda can ring pulls.

It was in this incoclasm that KTZ's SS18 collection struck a pleasantly truthful discordant note. In an age of Kendall Jenner handing out Pepsi as a tonic to a world burning down around us, it struck a slightly truer chord with the British punk spirit that ring pulls we're now being used to obscure a face rather than sell one.

The narrative of struggle become very much one of violent resistance as the collection moved into check flannel shirts and distressed denim. With skinhead models in khaki bomber jackets and biker boots a la 'This Is England' or black nylon hoodies, checked scarfs worn like masks, baseball caps and black biker gloves (with specially reinforced knuckles) the runway became a stage for defiant proletariat riot gear.

At a time of great uncertainty in British politics and economics, huge rifts in class and opportunity, and repeated violent attacks on British people and our way of life. This London collection paid passionate tribute to a great history of struggle and rebellion against oppression and was a great reminder that we will overcome. Of course we will, this is England.

Words: Mitchell Cooper | Fashion Week Press | @catsandjackets
Images: Tegan Rush  Fashion Week Photographer | @tegan.photography