With the launch of Samsung's new Galaxy Gear Smartwatch and Google Glass slowly edging towards the mainstream population, we can't help but wonder how this new, wearable spy-esque tech could be exploited. We love Samsung's amazing advances over the years especially their amazing cameras and TVs, but the question raised by BBC journalist Rory Cellan-Jones as to 'Why would anybody want a camera on their wrist' did bring to mind a quote from BBC2 comedy show, Coupling, in which the leading character, Steve Taylor said something along the lines of 'Man's advances in technology are all simply aimed at making it easier and better to view porn'.

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Now we're not even sure if this watch can view or take video files yet, but having a secret watch camera could easily lead to wrong doing more than candid photos of your mates. The internet is filled with celebrity up-skirt pictures, nip slips and the like, many taken by the large number of readily available spy cameras (google spy camera, it's shocking) could things like this see a certain rise once devices like this become readily available? Especially when it comes to technology like Google Glass. These glasses are able to record what you see, when you see it- the poor woman who's skirt got caught in the wrong gust of wind (or worse) might end up online for all to see, hosted in a foreign country with different laws where she would have no control over the content being taken down.

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Obviously we love the advances in technology that we are privileged to being part of over the past decades and beyond and are by no means saying that these advances should halt, everyone has wanted a James Bond watch and it's about damn time we got one. But the manipulating and secretive nature of some tech advances could come in handy in ways that aren't ideal. Cue funny video:

What we feel needs to be looked at, in this ever advancing technological world however, is that age old Spiderman saying - that with great power comes great responsibility, we feel the policing of such technology needs to step up...

Twitter was founded in 2006 and it is only now, seven years later that action is being taken to try and control the potentially abusive nature of the site after the trolling abuse Jane Austin suffered, despite this kind of thing happening to some of its general users everyday. Is technology moving so fast that laws and the supervision of its use can't keep up? Should it be the service providers job to keep an eye on things as part of the sales agreement or possibly the responsibility lies with the developers?

While many people argue against "big brother" keeping an eye on us all, should only the guilty really be worried about what they have to hide? Or is the right to ones privacy from everyone (even the law) more important than protecting those suffering from the crimes? Is it ignorant of us to moan about police keeping tabs on things and not granting them more control when hackers and such are already potentially watching us through our Smart TV?

When we purchase a TV we have to provide our name and address to register ourselves as a user so the TV Licence people can chase us up if we choose not to pay our bills. Would such forced registration on these tech items be such a bad idea? At least that way images taken could potentially be traced to the serial number of the device used and criminals punished?

Personally I wouldn't have a problem with it as I plan to mostly use my spy watch to take photos of the banks I intend to heist....oh wait...ignore that part.