Category: London News

London Fashion Week can be tiring – what with being on your feet all day and running between shows with barely a moment to grab a Pret sandwich, so the chance to step into the POSTER GIRL spa at the BFC Discovery Lab was very welcome.

Except this was no ordinary salon, this was sixties ‘Beauty School Dropout’ on acid. Neon lights lit the room whilst disco tunes played in the background – okay, so not quite the relaxing scenario we had in mind!

 

Some models lounged on psychedelic-swirl chairs in face masks and hair rollers, others posed in line waiting for their treatments whilst the salon receptionist flicked through a vintage copy of Vogue and answered the kitschy lip-shaped telephone.

And what was on the treatment list? Retro-print knitted co-ords, cycling shorts, metallic slip dresses, plunging necklines and pink, pink and more pink.

The designers' micro-metal mesh dresses from SS19 were there, this time updated in bubble gum pink and magenta and layered over a bell sleeve top.

The knitwear gave a sixties vibe but with a contemporary twist; there were leggings, a flared jumpsuit, polo-style tops and cycling shorts – all with zip-up detailing.  The Hackney-based design duo, Francesca Capper and Natasha Somerville, pride themselves on ensuring all garments are adjustable to fit each individual body shape with ease. And they were keen to show off the versatility of the pieces – a model who looked to be in her sixties or seventies showed the clothes weren't just for the young. She sat under a retro hair drying hood in a ribbed-knit midi dress, paired with magenta tights and fluffy salon slippers of course.

The looks were accessorised with super-pointy mules, transparent bags and candy jewellery – gummy rings and fizzy strips were crafted into chunky necklaces and cherry jellies dangled from the model's earlobes.

Would we like to book for a future appointment? Absolutely!

Words by: Lucy Hardy

Images by: Jessamine Cera

Do you dream of working from home? Are you stuck in a 9-5 that just doesn’t inspire you? Or maybe you’re wondering how you can fill your time whilst the little ones are napping? Many of us dream of having our own little business; we all hear of incredible success stories where a huge multi million pound business began at a kitchen table. Or maybe you just want to work for yourself, and have a little extra income? Whatever your dreams might be, don’t wait on them anymore, why not make 2019 the year that you finally make a start on your future.

You don’t have to have a small fortune to start a business or have investments to fall back on – click the link to find out more about the latest in investments – all you need is a little time, a plan and determination to see it through. Read on for 5 start-up businesses you could start at home.

Cake making

Who knew you could make money from your delicious bakes? If you have a creative flair in the kitchen and simply love creating beautiful cakes, tray bakes and cupcakes, then why not charge for your services? From boxes of cupcakes for Valentines day, to made to order birthday cakes and even wedding cakes too. If you feel like you need to brush up on your icing skills, then you can always take a course or follow some simple YouTube tutorials until you’re feeling more confident.

Cleaning

Is there anything more straightforward? Anyone can make money from cleaning, whether you start small and help an elderly neighbour or a busy mum for a couple of hours, or you take it to the next level and start cleaning offices and workspaces. All you need is some cleaning equipment and a means of transportation to get started.

House sitting

Many people don’t like the idea of leaving their home empty whilst they’re away on holiday and that’s where house sitters come in. House sitting requires a lot of trust, so you’ll need to build a bit of a following and a reputation before potential clients enquire about your services. Start with the houses of friends and family and get them to leave you a review on your social media pages. You’ll soon see interest from new clients!

Dog walking

With so many commitments and work getting in the way, many people struggle to find the time to walk their dogs, turning to dog walkers instead. If you love dogs and enjoy getting out and about, then this job is one you’ll enjoy. Again, start by building a reputation via your friends and family’s pets first on your social media pages.

Photography

If you enjoy taking photographs and are pretty confident with a camera, then why not look into photography? From nightclubs, to birthday parties, even weddings and business shoots, people will pay good money to have special moments captured. Try enrolling in a photography course in your chosen field to brush up on your skills.

Held in the Freemasons' Hall on Sunday early afternoon, A-Jane was a London Fashion Week show that got everyone talking. The models walked in one by one, moving around the stage posing for the big crowd of photographers as they did - the room was packed out and full of energy.

A-Jane for this collection focused on Neue Musik (new music), which is intended to create artistic inspiration and optimism, while challenging the traditional composition structure. With this in mind, A-Jane’s AW19 range broke design boundaries by beginning her collection with no lines, no paper and no preconceptions. The Neue Musik movement provides endless inspiration to designer Alice Jane and has allowed her ideas to flow freely and not ‘follow key’ - no pun intended!

Continuing this inspiration from creation to presentation, each model used various instruments, including (but not limited to) spoons, sand paper and glass chimes, to create clashing sounds and a feeling of chaos – something mirrored throughout each piece in this collection.

Emphasising the philosophy behind the Neue Musik movement – Alice is leading the way by not allowing her creativity to be restricted with strict lines, shapes or structures, instead opting for flowing silhouettes of waves and curves, for a sense of freedom.

Sticking with a primary colour palette, this collection is full of staples – from the oversized printed midi skirts and dresses to the high neck green jumpers and blue ruffled inserts, so you’ll fall for new shapes in the colours you know and love.

Words: Andrea McCaul| Fashion Week Press | @andreaelizam
Images: Eloise Peachey |Fashion Week Photographer | @eloisepeacheyphoto

First comes love, then comes marriage -  then comes baby in a baby carriage. Old nursery school rhyme, or a foreshadowing of the natural progression of Ryan Lo’s most recent collections? As we return to London Fashion Week for another season, what better way to open proceedings than with this WJ London favourite and his fantastical interpretation of romance, tradition and the even the British monarchy - whether in a past century, or the next.

After delivering a memorable proposal for SS19 (whereby Lo invited us to observe a romantic tale that culminated in a princely “I do”), this season’s autumn/winter offering saw the story pick up at its next chapter: a right royal birth. There definitely felt like there was an element of cosmic timing at play, what with the media’s current thirst for information on the next addition to the British monarchy, but Ryan’s opening pram push was the stuff of a dystopian fairy tale. No blue for a boy, pink for a girl here: just lashings of mourning black, British pomp and traditional Victoriana details.

Across his catalogue of work, the explosive frenzy and candy pink colour of Kawaii culture often juxtaposes the dark and glamorous, whilst his fondness for childhood motifs jars with his creative vision for the future. That’s what’s so exciting about Lo: his duality. Hailing from Hong Kong but London-based by desire, Lo playfully dances between curious contrasts and opposites to create his own twisted fantasy world. It was a far cry from Lo’s usual hyper-feminine frills and frothiness, but this dichotomy was still at the epicentre of the entire collection, with these different locations playing a key part.

Despite a stiff-upper-lip entrance of the new royal parents and a more gothic tone to the collection, there was plenty of Lo’s cute and whimsy to satisfy his diehard fans. Pink tulle featured, accessorised with Royal Guard bearskin hats, reimagined in bubblegum pink, feathers and fluff by none other than Phillip Jones. Corset lace front dresses in virginal white were befitting of a princess, whilst quilted coat dresses, brocade coordinates and ruffled collars were undoubtedly Mother of Bride worthy in some alternative world.

Words: Camilla Hunt | Fashion Editor | @camillamcleanhunt
Images: Tegan Rush | Fashion Week Photographer | @tegalouise

Blue Monday has been and gone but let's face it, we're still here in January, it's still pretty chilly, Christmas is a distant memory and any sign of spring is a fair way off.

All that chilly gloom needn't be an excuse for misery though. We're thinking of coining a new day, thoughtful Tuesdays, as we all know that doing something for others cheers you up and cheers them up in turn why not do something night for someone today, or this week even?

Why not send something nice to a loved one or a friend this week?  Brighten their day up with a bunch of flowers that's totally out of the blue. Always does the job!

Alternatively, make those dinner dates you never got around to before Christmas. I know it's all been a bit of an over-indulge since December but that's no excuse to hibernate.

Make a gym date, a vegan dinner date or a brisk walk in the park date with people you've not seen in a while.

Another way to brighten your feel good this January is to have a clear out. Get rid of all those clothes you never wear and drop them at the charity shop. Let them do some good for someone else rather than languish at the bottom of your wardrobe for another year!

All in all the best and surest way to cheer up both yourself and others at the start of 2019 is to get active and get giving out the 'nice'. Whether it's flowers, homemade cupcakes or a friendly phone call, it doesn't take much but it makes a whole lot of difference.