Category: Fashion

I have so many clothes.. Clothes that don't fit me anymore but one day THEY WILL fit me again, clothes that I have never worn, clothes that I wore once, clothes that I have convinced myself I will wear (crop tops) but in reality they're never going to see the light of day...

I know I don't need them, I know I should get rid of them, but my heart bleeds when I think about how much money I've spent on all these useless garments over the years. That's why I'm always on the look out for something like this Swap and Style Event put on my Love Not Landfil. It is PERFECT for my needs.

So whether you're doing it for the environment and the greater good or to save a few pennies, or just for a fashion-focused day out pop on down and take a look at the bargains and wonderful one-off pieces on offer. You'll be hard pushed not to find something as the event is held at London’s largest fashion recycling warehouse, LM Barry in Canning Town on 24th April, 10am-midday.

This Swap and Style event is a rare opportunity to rummage through thousands and thousands of unwanted clothes to uncover and select new outfits with the help of Emma Slade-Edmondson, the stylist behind Back of the Wardrobe and Charity Fashion Live.

For those that love to document theres even the opportunity to be photographed by a fashion photographer in your fabulous finds!

The event comes under the banner of Fashion Revolution which launches on the 22nd April to encourage a more mindful and socially responsible way of thinking about clothes. Fashion is the second most polluting industry in the world after oil* and the rise in fast fashion has meant that the amount of clothes produced each year globally has doubled in 15 years from 2000 to 2015.

#Lovenotlandfill is a campaign aimed at young fast fashion fans in London. The goal is to reduce the environmental impact of the fashion industry via a core message: love your clothes then pass them on when you’ve finished with them so someone else can love them too. The campaign will remind young people to:

  • Never dump unwanted clothes in a household bin as they clog up landfill and release harmful climate change gases
  • Recycle, share, swap or repair unwanted clothes
  • Share the message with your friends

Event attendees are encouraged to swap their unwanted clothes with new items that they find in the giant treasure trove at L M Barry Textile Recyclers on the 24th April.

Tickets are FREE but you will be required to pay £15 to reserve your space. This will be refunded on your arrival at LM Barry for the event.

All proceeds from non-attendance will go to Fashion Revolution, a social enterprise which works towards a fashion industry that values people, the environment, creativity and profit in equal measure.

You can reserve your tickets here.

L M Barry Textile Recyclers, North Crescent, Canning Town, London E16 4TG

 

 

Paula Knorr AW/18 - 180 The Strand

Could there be a more glamorous and elegantly stunning collection than that of Paula Knorr? Well, the designer, most recognised and well known for creating clothing that empowers women has done it again. Knorr’s AW18 collection featured some stunning pieces, once again we see the signature aesthetic use of materials such as Lamé, mesh and liquid-like velvet.

Giving a nod to the lucrative feel of the material, we see the models in the Knorr show standing vigilantly around a large flowing piece of Lamé on the floor, the fluidity of it all and reflection of the lighting allowing the aesthetic glittering principles of the material to stand out on the models, giving them their appearance of deities.

Within the collection we see the use of elegantly layers, primarily focused around one shoulder dresses with a mixture of shiny black, neutral palettes and sanguine colours. Slit dresses and lengthy forearm wraps are also a feature alongside sequinned, and mesh tops and skirts completed with linear patterns throughout. Pointed-toe shoes are also present, giving the already lucrative collection a sharp edge.

Knorr’s feature of bauhaus inspired jewellery presents a welcome juxtaposition to the fluidity of her collection, as we see linear-inspired metallic ear pierces and a totally cool hybrid between a ring styled bracelet.

If you are heading to any award shows or big events this year or, perhaps, you simply want to look and feel amazing, then this collection is the one for you.

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Press

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

 

Dilara Findikoglu - London Banking Hall

A low lit room, combined with the classically inspired architecture of London’s Banking Hall set the scene for Findikoglu’s AW/18 collection, where we see Findikoglu’s designs reflect some aspects of a Tim Burton gothic styled film. The models makeup vaguely reminiscent of an renaissance styled painting, the clothing itself featuring structured jumpsuits and pin-stripe blazers adorned with a selection of renaissance styled images - particularly focusing around eyes and hand drawn female figurative portraits and photographs, lending the collection a totally eerie but super cool perspective.

The collection featured elements mainly around the use of leather and PVC, focusing on the prominence and stand-out reflective aesthetic of these materials. Patchwork cut outs are seen emblazoned along open neck blazers with other items adorned with patterned silk sashes around areas such as the waistline complete slashed open dresses.

With the images reflecting the inspiration around the clothing, as we see several of Findikoglu’s designs draw inspiration and focus around different historical periods, ranging from the iconic broad shoulder pads of the 80’s flanked against exaggerated white cuffs and overgrown shirts, Iconic Sphinx and snake-like patterns commonly associated with the ancient Egyptian culture and the gown wearing, open upper torso dresses popular within the Tudor period.

Accessories are an abstract but all necessary feature within this collection as we see several pieces including miniature figurines, broad open angular diamond jewellery, nude photographic portraits and those all too necessary items of cutlery which lend an all-too-cool steampunk inspired look to the clothing.

(Why go hunting around the office for a clean spoon when you can carry one with you at all times right?)

Angular neck pieces were also on show, which had a life of their own altogether. With other items following suit such as large angular belts encrusted with the signature steampunk cogs, gears and  lengthy beaded tassels. There’s even a Bladerunner themed Zhora PVC shawl - who couldn’t resist this?

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Writer |

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

In her latest exploration of the woman, for AW18 Edeline Lee transported us to a secret garden, where we find Eve – still and reflective. This season Lee is taking a moment for self-reflection. Stepping into one of Lee’s presentations is always a relaxing occasion. She included a copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Forest Reverie within the show notes, encouraging us to pause for thought away from the hustle and bustle of the fashion week circus, whilst soothing gong music played in the background.

Whilst impeccably tailored as always, compared to Lee’s previous work this collection was fairly subdued and lacked the quirky nuances of which Lee is known for. Gone were the extreme length sleeves and abstract shapes from last season; silhouettes were monastic and modest. Lee does well to appeal to the growing market for modest high fashion.

The colour palette was suitably autumnal, consisting of rich jewel tones of deep purple, red, moss green and navy. Pieces include floor length dresses in Lee’s signature flou bubble jacquard, styled under heavy weight coats. Garments were elegantly flourished with tassels, knots and folds.

Shorter length dresses were paired with skin tight sock boots in a range of colours that disappeared underneath the dresses. Trousers were wide legged and heavy weight in floral jacquard, styled with matching ruffled cropped top. The floral elements of the collection came in deep, dark colours as well as lighter, brighter shades.

 

Overall, Lee’s foray into the secret garden was luxurious and refined – but missing an alluring edge.

 

Words: Lucy Hardy | Fashion Week Writer | @lula_har

Photography by Jessamine Cera  | Fashion Week Photographer |

 

The lights dim and a red spotlight illuminates a set of bronze gates. Behind the bars, a man with a huge fur coat dances alongside two women. A pause in the music, and he opens the doors, stepping into bright white light – and then the beat drops.

The man is tattooed, with a shaved, bubblegum-pink haircut and the crowd cheers loudly as he reaches into a bag and starts throwing money around.

This whole spectacle energises the room and wouldn't look out of place in a music video. It is evident that the theme for the show is based on R&B and Hip Hop culture.

Fortie Label is an urban-luxe brand, and for AW18 at Covent Garden's Freemason's Hall, it drew inspiration from 'Forty Thieves' – an all-female London crime syndicate – and combined it with elements from 90s video vixens.

As the first model walked out in just a bikini, the man took off his fur coat and clothed her, leaving himself with a bare chest. Considering the collection plays on female sexuality and empowerment, this could be symbolic. A shift in power from the man to the woman.

Each model walks with a strong air of confidence and owns her body and style. There are caramel tones and gold jewellery, oversized denim and PVC shorts, sheer tracksuits and hoodies worn with one sleeve off. It's nostalgia with a modern edge.

There is such a buzz in the room. From the people in the crowd to the dancing models on the catwalk, everyone is excited by not only the new season design but by what this brand stands for – "kickin' ass through clothes."

Words: Sunna Naseer | Fashion Week Press | @sunna_naseer
Images: Fashion Scout