Author: Camilla Hunt

Who's Jack Fashion Week Editor, avid Bukowski enthusiast and lover of all things sequin.

If Matty Bovan's last collection was apocalyptic, the latest SS19 collection was the stage on which the natural world slowly began to reclaim the post-apocalyptic landscape. From the first look, featuring a deconstructed gown of netting, crinoline and a precariously towering floral headpiece, foliage and creeping vines were woven into the fabric of the collection and the psyches of those watching from the darkness.

Inspired by the back garden of his childhood suburban Yorkshire home and the point where rolling hills and moors clashed with the urban sprawl, one felt the full force of his creative vision in a masterful display of mixed fabrics and media. From hand crocheted flowers adorning further striking gowns sprouting tufts of dark greens, purples, yellows and blacks, to screen-printed figure-hugging dresses belted around the chest with gypsy-esque bikini tops, there was something carnivalesque about the clash of colours, textures and silhouettes. The increasingly eccentric and whimsical headpieces featuring everything from toilet plungers to plates of sushi recalled some sort of mad hatters tea party and the imaginative games of childhood summers.

However, this collection did not succumb to nostalgia. Models with intricately dyed hair reminiscent of The Man Who Fell to Earth that matched a gorgeous array of laced ankle boots and canary yellow cuban-heeled highwayman's boots designed by Gina kept driving this energetic collection forward.

In a time when the London Fashion Scene, mirroring the wider socio-political climate has been through something of a crisis, one felt a glimmer of hope. A message that the natural world, that beauty, inspiration and creativity would reclaim a scene that had become a slave to social media and plagued by plastic influencers. This collection was subversive, but subversive for being beautiful, natural and expressive.

In the words of the late, great Leonard Cohen, "there is a crack in everything, that's how the light gets in".

Words: Mitchell Kirkham-Cooper| Writer

Images: Eloise Peachey | Fashion Week Photographer | @eloisepeacheyphoto

 

 

Paula Knorr AW/18 - 180 The Strand

Could there be a more glamorous and elegantly stunning collection than that of Paula Knorr? Well, the designer, most recognised and well known for creating clothing that empowers women has done it again. Knorr’s AW18 collection featured some stunning pieces, once again we see the signature aesthetic use of materials such as Lamé, mesh and liquid-like velvet.

Giving a nod to the lucrative feel of the material, we see the models in the Knorr show standing vigilantly around a large flowing piece of Lamé on the floor, the fluidity of it all and reflection of the lighting allowing the aesthetic glittering principles of the material to stand out on the models, giving them their appearance of deities.

Within the collection we see the use of elegantly layers, primarily focused around one shoulder dresses with a mixture of shiny black, neutral palettes and sanguine colours. Slit dresses and lengthy forearm wraps are also a feature alongside sequinned, and mesh tops and skirts completed with linear patterns throughout. Pointed-toe shoes are also present, giving the already lucrative collection a sharp edge.

Knorr’s feature of bauhaus inspired jewellery presents a welcome juxtaposition to the fluidity of her collection, as we see linear-inspired metallic ear pierces and a totally cool hybrid between a ring styled bracelet.

If you are heading to any award shows or big events this year or, perhaps, you simply want to look and feel amazing, then this collection is the one for you.

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Press

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

 

Dilara Findikoglu - London Banking Hall

A low lit room, combined with the classically inspired architecture of London’s Banking Hall set the scene for Findikoglu’s AW/18 collection, where we see Findikoglu’s designs reflect some aspects of a Tim Burton gothic styled film. The models makeup vaguely reminiscent of an renaissance styled painting, the clothing itself featuring structured jumpsuits and pin-stripe blazers adorned with a selection of renaissance styled images - particularly focusing around eyes and hand drawn female figurative portraits and photographs, lending the collection a totally eerie but super cool perspective.

The collection featured elements mainly around the use of leather and PVC, focusing on the prominence and stand-out reflective aesthetic of these materials. Patchwork cut outs are seen emblazoned along open neck blazers with other items adorned with patterned silk sashes around areas such as the waistline complete slashed open dresses.

With the images reflecting the inspiration around the clothing, as we see several of Findikoglu’s designs draw inspiration and focus around different historical periods, ranging from the iconic broad shoulder pads of the 80’s flanked against exaggerated white cuffs and overgrown shirts, Iconic Sphinx and snake-like patterns commonly associated with the ancient Egyptian culture and the gown wearing, open upper torso dresses popular within the Tudor period.

Accessories are an abstract but all necessary feature within this collection as we see several pieces including miniature figurines, broad open angular diamond jewellery, nude photographic portraits and those all too necessary items of cutlery which lend an all-too-cool steampunk inspired look to the clothing.

(Why go hunting around the office for a clean spoon when you can carry one with you at all times right?)

Angular neck pieces were also on show, which had a life of their own altogether. With other items following suit such as large angular belts encrusted with the signature steampunk cogs, gears and  lengthy beaded tassels. There’s even a Bladerunner themed Zhora PVC shawl - who couldn’t resist this?

Words: Nathan Mills | Fashion Week Writer |

Images: Joshua Atkins | Fashion Week Photographer | Website

In her latest exploration of the woman, for AW18 Edeline Lee transported us to a secret garden, where we find Eve – still and reflective. This season Lee is taking a moment for self-reflection. Stepping into one of Lee’s presentations is always a relaxing occasion. She included a copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Forest Reverie within the show notes, encouraging us to pause for thought away from the hustle and bustle of the fashion week circus, whilst soothing gong music played in the background.

Whilst impeccably tailored as always, compared to Lee’s previous work this collection was fairly subdued and lacked the quirky nuances of which Lee is known for. Gone were the extreme length sleeves and abstract shapes from last season; silhouettes were monastic and modest. Lee does well to appeal to the growing market for modest high fashion.

The colour palette was suitably autumnal, consisting of rich jewel tones of deep purple, red, moss green and navy. Pieces include floor length dresses in Lee’s signature flou bubble jacquard, styled under heavy weight coats. Garments were elegantly flourished with tassels, knots and folds.

Shorter length dresses were paired with skin tight sock boots in a range of colours that disappeared underneath the dresses. Trousers were wide legged and heavy weight in floral jacquard, styled with matching ruffled cropped top. The floral elements of the collection came in deep, dark colours as well as lighter, brighter shades.

 

Overall, Lee’s foray into the secret garden was luxurious and refined – but missing an alluring edge.

 

Words: Lucy Hardy | Fashion Week Writer | @lula_har

Photography by Jessamine Cera  | Fashion Week Photographer |

 

Settling in to our seats in the BFC Showspace on the first day of LFW AW18, we were primed and ready to start the season off with Bora Aksu’s signature florals and floating fabrics. His beautiful and feminine collections are a much-loved staple of fashion week, providing tranquillity amongst the madness. So we were all intrigued when the first model marched onto the runway in a navy tailored jacket and wide-legged trousers, no lace or sheer fabrics in sight.

Inspired by the story of Margaret Ann Bulkley, a woman back in the 1800s who had to dress as a man in order to practice as a surgeon, this season’s collection is an exploration of that metamorphosis, from woman to man and back again.

Structured silhouettes, heavy velvet materials and dark, rich colours emulated the masculine uniform that Bulkley had to wear in her role as Dr James Barry, but flamboyant edging and intricate detailing nod to the female within.

As the collection develops, hemlines become more floating, fabrics become lighter and jackets sit over dresses and skirts, juxtaposing the two opposite styles in a way that complements each of them, as well as the wearer.

Of course, it wouldn’t be an Aksu show without his florals; layers of pastel pleats in tulle and organza eventually appear on the catwalk, sat atop simple silhouettes, giving them depth and intrigue and eluding to the enigmatic nature of Bulkley and the mystery of her role.

As the models reappeared in the show space and lined up in a group ready to walk around the room one last time in a synchronised strut, the exposition that runs through the collection became even more evident. Ultimately, this collection is still the Aksu that we know and love, but his exploration of femininity now moves beyond the confines of societal expectations and stereotypes to delve into what it means to be a woman in today’s world – and indeed, for one woman in Georgian society.

 

Words: Katharine Bennett | Fashion Week Press | @misskatebennett

Photos: Mikayla Miller | Fashion Week Photographer | @mikaylajeanmiller